EMPOWERING CONFIDENT, INDEPENDENT YOUNG WOMEN

EMPOWERING CONFIDENT, INDEPENDENT YOUNG WOMEN

The Oldest Girls' Boarding School in South Africa

The Diocesan School for Girls (DSG) was founded in 1874 by Bishop Nathaniel Merriman as a sister school to St Andrew’s College (est. 1955). The initiative was driven by Dorothea Beale, the headmistress of Cheltenham Ladies’ College, a visionary educationist who sought to elevate education standards for young women. Beale’s progressive philosophy influenced the early years of DSG, with the first four headmistresses being alumnae of Cheltenham Ladies’ College, including the founding headmistress Catherine Espin. This connection infused Beale’s ideals into the ethos of DSG, emphasizing the importance of providing young girls with a robust education.

Beale’s pioneering efforts were summed up in her quote, “Raise my whole sex and with it the world,” advocating for the transformative impact of educating women. Her influence ensured that DSG was grounded in the belief that an excellent education for girls was crucial for societal progress. This legacy continues today, with DSG and Cheltenham Ladies’ College maintaining a solid relationship, sharing ideas, and creating opportunities for interaction between staff and pupils. The school’s foundation reflects a forward-thinking approach to women’s education, one that has shaped its enduring commitment to academic excellence and empowerment.

A POTTED HISTORY

The Diocesan School for Girls was modelled on an English Public School, with particular influence arising from Cheltenham Ladies’ College, whose headmistress, Miss Dorothy Beale, was an assertive activist for girls’ education. The first four headmistresses of the DSG – Mrs Espin, Miss Battey, Miss Strong and Miss Burt – were Cheltenham Ladies’ College Old Girls, as was the much-loved ninth headmistress, Miss Fowler. Up to the present day, the relationship between the two schools remains strong. It was through these early headmistresses that Miss Beale’s educational aims and ideals to instill a desire for knowledge that would guide a woman throughout her lifetime and to introduce more rigorous academic subjects, were injected into the ethos of the DSG.

A POTTED HISTORY

The Diocesan School for Girls was modelled on an English Public School, with particular influence arising from Cheltenham Ladies’ College, whose headmistress, Miss Dorothy Beale, was an assertive activist for girls’ education. The first four headmistresses of the DSG – Mrs Espin, Miss Battey, Miss Strong and Miss Burt – were Cheltenham Ladies’ College Old Girls, as was the much-loved ninth headmistress, Miss Fowler. Up to the present day, the relationship between the two schools remains strong. It was through these early headmistresses that Miss Beale’s educational aims and ideals to instill a desire for knowledge that would guide a woman throughout her lifetime and to introduce more rigorous academic subjects, were injected into the ethos of the DSG.

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No Admission fee is charged. We do recommend that you return the form as soon as possible. An Entrance Deposit is requested once the pupil has been accepted the year prior to entry.

ICONOGRAPHY
No Admission fee is charged. We do recommend that you return the form as soon as possible. An Entrance Deposit is requested once the pupil has been accepted the year prior to entry.